Tag Archives: Isle of Mull

Tour Report – Isle of Mull 2013

September 4th, 2013

Every June I join friends and fellow wildlife photographers Chris Mattison and Nick Garbutt to run a photography tour to the Isle of Mull. During the week we guide our guests through a diverse range of photographic techniques, from the basics of getting the correct exposure right through to capturing birds in flight. Below are a selection of images from this year’s tour.

Thrift {Armeria maritima} - Isle of Staffa

Flowering thrift {Armeria maritima} growing amongst basalt columns. Isle of Staffa, Inner Hebrides, Scotland, UK.

During June, swathes of thrift adorn the rocky coastline with pink flowers. It is a time of plenty, with photographic opportunities presenting themselves all of the time.

Atlantic puffins (Fratercula arctica) - Treshnish Isles

Atlantic puffins (Fratercula arctica), Isle of Lunga, Treshnish Isles, Scotland, June.

One of the highlights of the tour is a visit to the Treshnish Isles, where clients get excellent opportunities to photograph sea bird colonies, including puffins. This year the cliff tops were covered in bluebells, allowing for an extra splash of colour when shooting low to the ground.

Thrift - Treshnish Isles

Isle of Lunga, Treshnish Isles, Inner Hebrides, Scotland, UK. Photographed with Canon 16-35mm.

We spend plenty of time getting to grips with macro photography, exploring some of the smaller subjects that inhabit Mull. A favourite every year is the round-leaved sundew, a carnivorous plants that traps insects with sticky droplets. These small plants grow in damp boggy areas across most of Mull.

Round-leaved sundew (Drosera rotundifolia)

Round-leaved sundew (Drosera rotundifolia). Isle of Mull, Scotland. June.

The island is dripping with ferns, providing yet more opportunities to experiment with abstract compositions.

Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas) Abstract

Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas) abstract, Isle of Mull, Scotland, UK. June.

When needed, Nick, Chris and I all use off-camera flash in our work.  Depending on your individual interest, we can guide you through working with flash in the field. Flash opens up many options in nature photography, freezing movement in a subject as well as providing a strong light source that allows for good depth of field. Flash also lets you create creative lighting setups, such as this jellyfish image below.

Lion's Mane Jellyfish {Cyanea capillata}

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish {Cyanea capillata}, photographed in mobie field studio, Isle of Mull, Scotland. June.

This juvenile jellyfish was photographed in a pyrex dish before being returned to the sea. It was backlit with a pair of off camera flashes (Canon 580 EX II’s triggered via Pocket Wizard radio triggers). To ensure a black background was achieved, the pyrex dish was supported a couple of feet above a piece of black fabric.

If you want to find out more about next year’s Mull trip, then details can be seen on my website: http://alexhyde.photoshelter.com/page1#Mull

All images and text copyright Alex Hyde – www.alexhyde.co.uk