More moths!

Aug 29th, 2013

Just over a week ago I put up a post about moth photography, looking particularly at creating white background cutout shots: http://wp.me/p3PJ2M-1f . This post concentrates on a couple of moth shots I have produced since then, exploring some more complex compositions. The first photograph below is of a beautiful little moth known as the Chinese Character {Cilix glaucoma}. This little chap is tiny at roughly one centimetre in length. All of my work with insects of this size is carried out with a very special lens that Canon make called the MP-E 65mm. It allows magnification up to x5 life size which in real terms means you can fill the frame with a grain of rice!

Chinese Character moth {Cilix glaucata}

Chinese Character moth {Cilix glaucata} – Canon MP-E 65mm, off-camera flash with diffuser, macro focussing rail

When viewing the world at high magnification, your creative options as a photographer are almost limitless. The Chinese Character moth above is resting on the petal of a clematis flower. By positioning my camera carefully, I was able to fill the background completely with another clematis petal, creating an incredibly vibrant image despite the fact that the main subject is a pale cream and grey moth. I lit the scene with a single off-camera flash with a diffuser fitted to soften the light. I also used a tripod-mounted macro focussing rail (made by Really Right Stuff) to ensure my focus was spot on.

Dusky Thorn {Ennomos fuscantaria}

Dusky Thorn moth {Ennomos fuscantaria} – Canon 100mm macro lens, tripod

My next shot (above) is of Dusky Thorn moth {Ennomos fuscantaria}. The wings of this moth look very like dead leaves, helping it to remain camouflaged throughout the day when it is at rest. As this moth is a fair bit bigger than the Chinese Character, I didn’t need the high magnification provided by the MP-E 65mm lens, so was able to use my Canon 100mm macro lens instead that offers x1 life size magnification. This lens is easier to use as it has a greater working distance (distance between front of lens and subject) so you are less likely to spook your subject. I used natural light for this shot and due to the shady conditions, this meant a shutter speed of over one second so a tripod was essential! The subtle colour palette works for me in this shot, showing off the moth’s camouflage.

Both of these images were taken in my back garden, which remains one of my most productive locations. The colourful flower bed and the messy corners of dead wood and decaying leaves provide a wealth of miniature landscapes to explore with the macro lens… and you are never too far from a cup of tea!

All images and text copyright Alex Hyde – www.alexhyde.co.uk

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